If you want that, then you're gonna have to do this.

A little tit for tat if you will.

Wednesday Governor Whitmer signed an executive order rolling back the restrictions on bars & restaurants. According to reports, starting on July 31, statewide indoor gatherings will be limited to 10 people,  and bars will be closed for indoor service across the state.

Read More: Gov. Whitmer Tightens State Restrictions for Bars & Restaurants

And several experts are weighing in and agreeing that if you want schools to open this fall and get kids back in class, you're going to have to tighten up now and start making some tough decisions.

It's not about punishing certain types of businesses but working ahead to keep numbers down and for us to not reach levels like other states.

So...partial shutdown.

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“We need to close the bars and restaurants and other silly things we don’t need to be doing so we can reopen schools,” said Mark Cheatham, health officer for the Mid-Michigan District Health Department, which includes Clinton, Gratiot and Montcalm counties. “Our priorities are a mess.” (MLive)

So the wheel of crazy keeps going round and round. Reopen the state to get the economy going again. Get people back to work. But we want to get kids back in school so more people can get back to work. But we need to close down some of the the things we reopened so we can keep the numbers down so we can get kids back to school.

This stuff makes my head hurt.

As of July 29 numbers, four Michigan counties -- including Saginaw, St. Joseph, Huron and Gogebic -- would struggle to keep in-person classes going even if they tried. To prevent a resurgence of cases, these districts must close bars and indoor dining too and really consider how much non-essential retail they are willing to tolerate. (MLive)

Peep the study below (and check out the map) from the Harvard Global Health Institute.

On the map, Michigan's risk level is color coded mostly yellow.

“Yellow counties are in a slightly better position, but must still make hard choices. To prevent a resurgence of cases, these districts must close bars and indoor dining too and really consider how much non-essential retail they are willing to tolerate. Getting to green will make opening schools much safer.” (Harvard Global Health Institute)

Path to Zero & Schools: Achieving Pandemic Resilient Teaching and Learning Spaces